Saturday, October 19, 2013

Do-Luck's DTM II, Part 1 - The Installation

Courtesy of the Do-Luck Website: http://www.do-luck.co.jp/product/1452
In perhaps another world's first, I was given the honor of being one of the first R33 GT-Rs on the road to be fitted with the DTM II - Do-Luck's even more advanced G-sensor - now with throttle position input and being driver and tuner programmable as well.  (I am certainly the first to do a full write up in English, so I hope I get this all correct!)

To review, the Do-Luck digital G-sensor devices (both the Digital G-Sensor model and the Tarzan GBOX) replace only the OEM G-sensor, located under the center console in the RB26 GT-Rs.
The Do-Luck Digital G-Sensor
The TARZAN GBOX
The DTM II adds not only 7 different settings, (1 of which is user programmable and 2 others which are programmable by select tuners; and the user also is able to modify all the maps simultaneously) but also an organic EL display unit with 5 input keys and compact enough to be mounted almost anywhere in the car.  Installation is straightforward, but since a picture is worth a thousand words:

The very plain box the DTM II comes in
The contents of the box
 The first step is to remove the shift knob, shift knob surround, and ashtray, and then undo the screws holding in the center console, in order to access the G-sensor installation location.  In my case, in my effort to keep my car looking as stock as possible, I chose to install the EL display unit inside the console box (and thus chose to give up the ability to be able to read the real time G readings displayed by the unit).

Fits very well indeed.

Of course this means having to drill a hole for the wiring...
Once the console box is removed, step back and review the scene: In my case, as I had previously installed Do-Luck's Digital G-Sensor, the gold OEM analog box was no longer there.

The Red Arrow on the Digital G Sensor shows the direction it should be installed

A closer look
 Remove the old G-sensor. With my car, installation was easier than usual because I had already removed the OEM G sensor. (click on this link for my blog post showing how to).

Removing the Digital G-Sensor
And here is how the DTM II looks, installed
So slightly larger than the Digital G Sensor
 The next step is to wire in the throttle position sensor leads. The instruction manual simply said to "splice in" but when I asked Ito-san about this, he clarified that you cut a particular wire coming out of the ECU loom, and then one wire from the DTM II is connected to one cut side, and the other wire to the other cut side.




Found on gtr.co.uk...Refer to the Instructions... they will say "Throttle Output Signal" which is Pin 56 ( I think this is common to the BNR32, BCNR33, and BNR34, but please verify).

Once that's done, all you have to do is thread the lead under the carpet so it ends up under the main unit. 
So this lead connects to the DTM II main box...
Like so.
Wait? What's this? Two EXTRA leads? 
 That's right. Two outputs. There are three input/output leads, one of which connects to the lead coming from the throttle position. The others are labelled "OPT" and "LOG." The "OPT" one, Ito-san tells me, will soon allow control of the A-LSD (active LSD) found in the V-Spec models (he's working on how it can be done).  The "LOG" lead is for those who like to datalog what is going on in the car.  The unit produces variable voltage according to the front/back and left/right G-forces, and so if you can record that, then you can log this data.


Install finished! Quite easy. No messing around with anything that will get your hands dirty (i.e. perfect for me).  In my next posts, I will go into HOW the DTM II works, how it can be programmed and other details NOT mentioned in the install manual (that I've seen) and yes, my driving impressions (in a word, AWESOME).

8 comments:

マット said...

Aki, you always seem to be the vanguard in trying out new products! Can't wait to read your full review on how it performs.

About the 'old' digital G-sensor, it wasn't too long ago that you installed that. Isn't that sort of a waste?

And thanks for answering my question on BNR32 ATTESA-ETS computer for standard GT-Rs and N1 GT-Rs. I was asking because recently I found on Yahoo Auctions, an ATTESA-ETS computer for the N1 spec street car. It has a product code from NISMO, and the description said it's more aggressive in activating the 4WD mode than standard. But the offer price was too high. Something like a DTM II would be much more cost effective.

Skyline33 said...

When will this G-sensor be available for sale? Because i have been looking on Nengun and can't find it.

Aki said...

Thanks, マット。 you sure find some cool things on YA. More so than me!

Skyline33 - it's available for sale in Japan, but as it's just been released those resellers will not have them in stock. Also, if you're near an authorized dealer they may have packages where they can pre-program certain of the settings for you. Where are you?

Skyline33 said...

Hi Aki thanks for the reply, i'm from Holland. I don't have a Skyline at the moment, sold my R33 GTS-T and looking for a GTR R33 to import these last few weeks.

But when i get one my first mod will be some sort of Digital G-sensor, not sure which because there are so many of them (Midori, Do-Luck, Tarzan and now this one)

So hopefully in a few months when i find a car and get it imported i will be out which i want.

Aki said...

Skyline33, you are very lucky to be in Holland then - Co-ordsport Netherlands (contact Wouter Vallen) will be one of the official dealers in Europe!

Aki

Targa Skyline said...

I have an R33 GTR (not V-spec)for tarmac rallies and uprated the g-sensor to the Tarzan G-box and that is fine. Is the ETS-II compatible with this or does it come with a new g-box?

Geoff.

Unknown said...
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Tarik Laaraj said...

Aki,

Thanks for going through all these trials and tribulations.
Currently looking at an R33 Vspec. Any updates on the A-LSD side?